rotator
rotator
rotator
rotator

CLASS ACTION SUIT FILED AGAINST SAN JACINTO RIVER AUTHORITY

Potts Law Firm, a Houston-based law firm, filed a class action on September 6, 2017, in the Harris County District Court seeking to represent all individuals and businesses recently affected by the San Jacinto River Authority’s handling of “controlled release” of water from Lake Conroe on August 27, 2017. As a result of the release, it is estimated that thousands of homeowners and business owners’ properties were flooded who had previously escaped flooding from Hurricane Harvey itself.

The lawsuit styled Thomas E. and Beth F. Ross, et.al. v. San Jacinto River Authority, et al., consists of two subclasses for (1) All Texas residential property owners who experienced flood waters at their property on or after Monday, August 28, 2017, in the area downstream of Lake Conroe affected by the rising waters of the San Jacinto River as a result of San Jacinto River Authority’s decision to release water from Lake Conroe; and (2) All Texas commercial property owners who experienced flood waters at their property on or after Monday, August 28, 2017, in the area downstream of Lake Conroe affected by the rising waters of the San Jacinto River as a result of San Jacinto River Authority’s decision to release water from Lake Conroe.

Plaintiffs owned property that was not flooding after Hurricane Harvey sat over Harris and Montgomery Counties on Saturday, August 26, 2017 and Sunday, August 27, 2017, but only began flooding on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 when the San Jacinto River Authority released water from Lake Conroe. After the release, Plaintiffs’ property took on several feet of flood water. The suit seeks damages for the government’s intentional taking of properties by flooding and seeks recovery for the repair costs to such properties, diminution in value of the properties, lost income or business income to the properties’ owners, and any consequential loss of the flooding. Inverse condemnation occurs when the government takes private property but fails to pay the compensation required by Section 17, Article 1 of the Texas Constitution. Similar lawsuits were filed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and a class action was certified by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims.

“In the devastating aftermath of the flooding, Potts Law Firm stands ready to support our clients, our employees, and our community at this most challenging time”, said Derek H. Potts, National Managing Partner in Houston. “This case is particularly important to us since it directly impacted so many friends, neighbors, and family members.”

Widely recognized for their expertise in complex litigation and trials, Potts Law Firm has obtained record-setting verdicts and settlements on behalf of clients in state and federal courts across the country. The attorneys with Potts Law Firm are dedicated to fighting for the rights of victims of flood and wind catastrophes.

About Potts Law Firm

Potts Law Firm diligently pursues a variety of complex litigation and mass tort matters, from complex pharmaceutical cases to challenging eminent domain claims. The firm’s team of highly competent attorneys have experience in many different areas complex litigation. Believing that every detail of a case matters, firm attorneys work tirelessly to pursue just compensation, regardless of the obstacles faced. For more information, visit www.potts-law.com

Anyone interested in being a part of the lawsuit can contact the Potts Law Firm at 713-963-8881 or visit www.potts-law.com.

About The Author

Related posts

2 Comments

  1. justalocal

    When development after development is built into fish bowls with no drainage, what do you expect to happen? As long as developers are handed carte blanche to rip out trees, create dust bowls and build into them and cover the ground with concrete, this will continue to happen. Building subdivisions South of reservoirs is not smart. Only in Houston where they think building on top of swamp land works until it doesn’t. Like New Orleans thinking that building a city BELOW sea level is smart. Buy on higher ground, surrounded by green. Not cement. Stop stripping trees from the land and covering it with concrete. Trees and natural landscape are there for a reason.

  2. michelle227

    They are NOT going to be happy when they see that discharges were occurring at a higher level over the weekend than on the day they claim releases ‘started.’

    They also demonstrate, as all of the greedy litigants in flood-related suits tend to do, that they have no clue about the movement of waters in the downstream flow and that there are reasons why water continues to rise downstream for a period of time AFTER rains cease.

Comments are closed.